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The African American Angler

Retired !

Freedom Riders (A Documentary on NonViolent Civil Right Movement in the US)

The only place in America where the people cant fish in the Great Lakes is Jim Crow Gary Indiana Negroes / African Americans in 2014 have to pay to fish in a retention pond for catfish & carps while the rest of the country has access to fish in the Great Lakes!

The reason for this inequity can be coming from African Americans in an attempt smite the White race because South Lake County Indiana would not support moving the Chicago Bears Football Team to Gary Indiana.

Talk Of Gary Bears Moves Some Fans To Jeers

December 25, 1995|By Stacey Singer, Tribune Staff Writer

Bears’ President Michael McCaskey was about as popular as the Grinch during the team’s final game of the season Sunday at Soldier Field.

The Bears managed a Christmas Eve victory over the Eagles, but even as fans celebrated, the Atlanta Falcons in San Francisco carried off their last playoff chance.

Thus ended a season that had both started and ended with rising and falling hopes, leaving thousands of fans irritable and angry.

Within the frozen stands, pockmarked with almost 14,500 no-shows, one hostile sign summed up the common sentiment: “All I want for Christmas is McCaskey’s front teeth.”

McCaskey kicked off the season with a threat to move the team elsewhere unless Chicago put its money where its team loyalty was.

Mayor Richard Daley quickly followed with the challenge, “Let them move to Alaska.”

Lance Hanson, 40, a controller with a Chicago-area electrical contracter, said he spent $1,400 on season tickets and a parking space this year, after spending nine years on the waiting list.

He was not amused.

"Sports now wants to cater to the corporate element. Well, a lot of people out here are working class, and they live for this on the weekends," said Hanson, who lives in Arlington Heights.

He waved his gloved hand toward Lake Michigan.

"This is the Bears. Being on the lakefront, out here in the cold."

Outside the stadium, addressing a live radio audience, Bears Vice President Ted Phillips took questions from ticket-holders.

Asked if he had any regrets about the stadium negotiations, Phillips had just a few words.

"It has become real antagonistic," he said. "That’s my real regret."

Both sides have tacitly agreed that McCaskey and the Bears have lost the public relations battle in this war of words over a new stadium.

In a change of tactics, they agreed last week to a news blackout while low-key talks continue through lawyers and fax machines.

Daley originally offered to renovate Soldier Field at a cost of about $156 million. The Bears scoffed, and said that at a minimum, the playing field would have to be rotated, which would add another $80 million to the price tag, according to mayoral aides.

A third option would build a domed, multipurpose stadium next to McCormick Place for about $390 million. Meanwhile, Gary, Ind., business leaders have offered a $482 million project.

The concept of the Gary Bears irritated most fans so much that they said Sunday they would never go there for their team.

"Gary is scary," muttered Al Miller, 45, an auto technician from Delavan, Wis.

"I live in Indiana, but I am still a dedicated Bears fan. It would be a disgrace if they moved out of Chicago," said Ken Chiakas, 29, a diesel engine salesman from Newburgh, Ind.

Phillips told fans Sunday that he also liked the idea of putting a new stadium in either Aurora or Hoffman Estates, but said it would need significant state financial support, something he did not foresee.

"The governor (Jim Edgar) has said we’re not going to that," Phillips said.

Throughout the season, Daley and the Bears leadership have battled not just for a stadium deal, but for public sympathy.

Daley accused McCaskey of wanting a new city tax to guarantee his profits; Phillips accused the mayor of having “verbal diarrhea” and mischaracterizing the team’s proposal, as the bitterness took on a personal tone.

Tailgating outside the stadium, friends Peter Griffith, 31, of Northbrook, and Kevin Kwaterski, 37, of Rolling Meadows, discussed the battle over freshly grilled hot dogs and beer.

"The team is not doing well enough for McCaskey to make those kind of threats," Griffith said. "If he wants his own stadium, he should foot the bill for it."

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1995-12-25/news/9512250037_1_soldier-field-playoff-chance-lake-michigan

The Public Trust Doctrine 
The public trust doctrine is the principle that certain resources are preserved for public use, and that the government is required to maintain them for the public’s reasonable use.
The ancient laws of the Roman Emperor Justinian held that the seashore (defined as waters affected by the ebb and flow of the tides) not appropriated for private use was open to all. This principle became the law in England as well. In the Magna Carta in England centuries later public rights were further strengthened at the insistence of the nobles that fishing weirs which obstructed free navigation be removed from rivers.
These rights were further strengthened by later laws in England and subsequently became part of the common law of the United States as established in Illinois Central Railroad v. Illinois, 146 U.S. 387 (1892). In that case the Illinois Legislature had granted an enormous portion of the Chicago harbor to the Illinois Central Railroad. A subsequent legislature sought to revoke the grant, claiming that original grant should not have been permitted in the first place. The court held that common law public trust doctrine prevented the government from alienating the public right to the lands under navigable waters (except in the case of very small portions of land which would have no effect on free access or navigation).
The public trust applies to both waters influenced by the tides and waters that are navigable in fact. The public trust also applies to the natural resources (mineral or animal) contained in the soil and water over those public trust lands. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_trust_doctrine

The Public Trust Doctrine

The public trust doctrine is the principle that certain resources are preserved for public use, and that the government is required to maintain them for the public’s reasonable use.

The ancient laws of the Roman Emperor Justinian held that the seashore (defined as waters affected by the ebb and flow of the tides) not appropriated for private use was open to all. This principle became the law in England as well. In the Magna Carta in England centuries later public rights were further strengthened at the insistence of the nobles that fishing weirs which obstructed free navigation be removed from rivers.

These rights were further strengthened by later laws in England and subsequently became part of the common law of the United States as established in Illinois Central Railroad v. Illinois, 146 U.S. 387 (1892). In that case the Illinois Legislature had granted an enormous portion of the Chicago harbor to the Illinois Central Railroad. A subsequent legislature sought to revoke the grant, claiming that original grant should not have been permitted in the first place. The court held that common law public trust doctrine prevented the government from alienating the public right to the lands under navigable waters (except in the case of very small portions of land which would have no effect on free access or navigation).

The public trust applies to both waters influenced by the tides and waters that are navigable in fact. The public trust also applies to the natural resources (mineral or animal) contained in the soil and water over those public trust lands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_trust_doctrine

Aerial Video of Gary Indiana Piers At Buffington Harbor

The Marquette Plan

The struggle continues in Gary Indiana !

The African American Angler

The struggle to overcome oppression in Gary Indiana continues the world has changed and the oppression is coming from a ruthless African American machine that has become a part of the the county machine who is comprised of a few tokens who do the bidding of the democratic machine who has us fishing in the swamp of Gary Indiana in a pay pond that the county operates while all the other races get to fish in Lake Michigan in the state of Indiana.

Tell the world what is going on here in Jim Crow Gary Indiana !

They are fishing for game fish and we are fishing for bottom feeders in the swamp with snakes and mosquitoes in the weeds along side the road and in nasty run off ditches with combined sewers!

The mayor is a sellout and a traitor!

Fish in Lake Michigan

She is

glib

[glib] Show IPA
adjective, glib·ber, glib·best.
1.
readily fluent, often thoughtlessly, superficially, or insincerely so: a glib talker; glib answers.
2.
easy or unconstrained, as actions or manners.
3.
Archaic. agile; spry.
Origin:
1585–95;  compare obsolete glibbery  slippery (cognate with Dutch glibberig )

glib·ly, adverb
glib·ness, noun
un·glib, adjective
un·glib·ly, adverb


1. talkative, loquacious; facile, smooth. See fluent.
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The Mayor often tells lies of omission! 

Lying by omission, otherwise known as exclusionary detailing, is lying by either omitting certain facts or by failing to correct a misconception. In the case of the former, an example of this would be a car salesmen claiming a car to have amazing fuel economy while neglecting to mention that it has no engine and is completely immobile. In the case of the latter, it could be a situation in which a misconception exists that the claimant is aware of but fails to correct, such as a person who wanders around a hospital dressed as a doctor, offering treatment while failing to mention that she is in fact just getting a kick out of pretending to be a doctor.

A fossil fuel company wishing to persuade us that generating CO2 is actually good for the environment would struggle to be taken seriously if they themselves were the public face of such a campaign, so in order to get around this a front group may be created. The front group could seem to be a grassroots movement, or at least one with no obvious connections to the fossil fuel industry, yet behind the scenes there are clear vested interests.

In 2009, Irish citizens voted on the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty (again), and during the campaigning a number of groups spring-up for and against the treaty. A group named “Coir” campaigned vigorously against ratification of the treaty, attracting controversy with regards to the veracity of their claims.[3] Although there was certainly a motley collection of anti-EU groups campaigning, Coir seemed somewhat suspicious, because while they were campaigning for ostensibly secular goals relating to human rights, their postal address was found to be shared with the extremist Roman Catholic group Youth Defence - known for their strong anti-abortion stance and allegations of homophobia. The workforce at Coir, oddly enough, is claimed to be a number of people also working for Youth Defence. 

Media outlets are under pressure to make money, and an easy way to do this is by breaking sensational stories. This can encourage the media to overplay news stories or leave out information that would detract from an otherwise great story. The Daily Mail, a UK newspaper, has a reputation for scare stories - with immigration and health scares figuring highly on their list of things that really should shock and disgust you! An example this would be to claim that immigrants are taking their jobs away from the native population while neglecting to mention that the jobs are low-paid, unpopular, and difficult to fill if not for immigrants.

Political leanings may lead to lying by partisan reporting, in which scandals involving one party as front page news while similar incidents among another are relegated to bylines buried towards the back of the newspaper. Whether or not this is lying by omission depends on the stated goal of the outlet in question.